St Therese of Lisieux | Friday 1 October 2021

Today is Friday the 1 October, the feast of St Teresa of the Child Jesus, in the 26th week of Ordinary time.

 

Maximillian sings, ‘Learning to love like You’. As you listen, can you pause now, and reflect on the ways that Jesus has loved us? And how others like St Therese of Lisieux have loved like Jesus throughout history…

 

Today’s reading is from the Book of Baruch.

 

Baruch 1:15-22

And you shall say: The Lord our God is in the right, but there is open shame on us today, on the people of Judah, on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and on our kings, our rulers, our priests, our prophets, and our ancestors, because we have sinned before the Lord. We have disobeyed him, and have not heeded the voice of the Lord our God, to walk in the statutes of the Lord that he set before us. From the time when the Lord brought our ancestors out of the land of Egypt until today, we have been disobedient to the Lord our God, and we have been negligent, in not heeding his voice. So to this day there have clung to us the calamities and the curse that the Lord declared through his servant Moses at the time when he brought our ancestors out of the land of Egypt to give to us a land flowing with milk and honey. We did not listen to the voice of the Lord our God in all the words of the prophets whom he sent to us, but all of us followed the intent of our own wicked hearts by serving other gods and doing what is evil in the sight of the Lord our God.

 

Today is the feast of St Therese of the Child Jesus, also known as St Therese of Lisieux, or the Little Flower. She is known for her ‘Little Way’ a commitment to carry out little acts of charity, and to make continual little sacrifices to God. This philosophy and her writings caused Pope John Paul II to make Therese a Doctor of the Church. Is she a saint known to you? Does her spirituality of little acts of kindness made with great love, have influence in your life?

 

In our reading for today, we hear the confession of the people living in Exile. It is difficult account to listen to, but an honest one. If they have suffered by being sent into exile, it is not the doing of the good God. How easy it can be to blame misfortune on a negligent or distant God.  Are there times when you have felt like this?

 

The beginning of reconciliation and healing begins with honesty.  Acknowledging that you have got it wrong breaks the barrier of shame. Instead of ‘Why me?’ we ask, in faith,  ‘What next?’

 

As you listen to the scripture again, place yourself with the people of God.

How does it feel to open your heart to the Lord in this way?

 

Talk now to God as you would to a friend; trust in our good God to respond with love…

 

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.